Grant Information


EPA awards brownfields grant funding to communities throughout the United States. These grants support revitalization efforts by funding environmental assessment, cleanup, and job training activities.

These grants are awarded annually through a competitive process with the grant deadline sometime each fall. Eligible applicants must submit a grant proposal that addresses all the requirements detailed in EPA’s proposal guidelines. Proposals are evaluated and ranked by evaluation panels. These panels evaluate each proposal according to set criteria. The highest-ranking proposals are then awarded grants.

EPA awards separate grants for assessment and cleanup of properties that have been contaminated with hazardous substances and those properties that are contaminated with petroleum products. Examples of hazardous substances include asbestos, solvents, metals and controlled substances such as methamphetamine. Petroleum-contaminated properties are commonly abandoned gas stations with underground storage tanks, as well as properties with aboveground storage tanks, such as bulk plants. Some properties may be contaminated with a mix of both hazardous substances and petroleum contamination. For these properties with ‘co-mingled’ contamination, EPA allows applicants to apply for two grants for the same property, or apply for a hazardous substance grant for co-mingled contaminants.

Grant Guidelines are available for downloading in either HTML or PDF format.

In order to apply for a grant, the site must meet certain qualifications:

  • Be a clear benefit to the community
  • Applicant must not have contributed to the contamination
  • Must meet the definition of a brownfields site

Additional petroleum site requirements:

  • Be of “relatively low-risk” compared with other petroleum only sites in the state
  • Have “no viable responsible party”
  • Be assessed, investigated, or cleaned up by a person not potentially liable for the contamination
  • Not be subject to a corrective action order under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • Not be funded by the leaking underground storage tank trust fund (LUST Trust)

Sites not eligible:

  • Sites listed or proposed for listing on the National Priorities List (Federal Superfund)
  • Sites subject to unilateral administrative orders, court orders, administrative orders on consent or judicial consent decrees issued to or entered into by parties under CERCLA
  • Sites that are subject to the jurisdiction, custody or control of the United States Government

Eligible Applicants

Type of Applicant

Assessment

RLF

Remedial Cleanup

Job Training

Local governments

X

X

X

X

Land clearance authority or other quasi-governmental entity that operates under the supervision and control of, or as an agent of local government

X

X

X

X

Government entity created by state legislature

X

X

X

X

Regional councils

X

X

X

X

Redevelopment agencies sanctioned by the State of Montana

X

X

X

X

The State of Montana

X

X

X

X

Indian tribes

X

X

X

X

Nonprofit organizations

 

 

X

X

Brownfields Assessment Grants

Assessment grants provide funds for inventory, characterization and assessment of brownfields properties. Assessment grant funds may also be used to develop cleanup plans and conduct community involvement related to brownfield properties. Assessment grants may not be used for actual cleanup. Assessment grants may be used to address sites contaminated by petroleum or hazardous substances, including hazardous substances co-mingled with petroleum. An entity may apply for a community-wide or site-specific grant. Community-wide assessment grant funding can be used to conduct a number of assessments on more than one property. Site-specific grant funding can only be used on the site identified in the grant application. The performance period for these grants is three years.

Assessment grant applicants may apply for up to $200,000. Applicants may seek a waiver to this limit and request up to $350,000. Such waivers must be based on the anticipated level of contaminants at a single site.

Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Grants

Eligible entities may apply for grant funding to establish a revolving loan fund. An RLF works by lending money to public and private borrowers to finance cleanup at brownfields properties. Loan payments of the principal and interest are then paid back into the RLF loan fund pool by the borrowers. An RLF may be capitalized for up to $1 million and the performance period is 5 years.

In addition to loans, a portion of the loan pool may be used for subgrants to eligible entities and nonprofit organizations. These subgrants do not require repayment to the loan pool. RLF subgrant applicants must own the site for which they are seeking funding by the time the award is made. RLF loans and subgrants may only be used for cleanup activities at eligible brownfields sites.

Brownfields Cleanup Grants

Cleanup grants provide funding to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. An eligible entity may apply for up to $200,000 per site. No entity should apply for more than five cleanup grants. Cleanup grant applicants must also own the site for which they are seeking funding by the time the award is made. Cleanup grants may be used to address sites contaminated by petroleum or hazardous substances, including hazardous substances co-mingled with petroleum. The performance period for these grants is three years.

Cleanup grants require a 20 percent cost share of the amount of funding provided by EPA. The cost share may be in the form of a contribution of money, labor, material, or services, and must be for eligible and allowable costs. The cost share cannot include administrative costs or be matched by other federal grant funds. A cleanup grant applicant may request a waiver of the 20 percent cost share requirement based on hardship.

Brownfields Job Training Grants

Training grants provide funding for environmental job training projects that will facilitate site assessments, remediation of brownfields properties, community involvement, or site preparation. To help ensure that economic benefits derived from brownfields revitalization efforts remain in local neighborhoods, EPA requires that job training grant applicants propose to serve a community that currently receives, or has received financial assistance from EPA’s other brownfields competitive grants. Training grants are intended to foster employment of trainees from socio-economically disadvantaged communities, provide quality worker-training, and give local residents an opportunity to qualify for jobs developed in environmental fields as a result of brownfields efforts.

An eligible entity may apply for up to $200,000. The project must be completed within 12 to 24 months.